Tour Every Room Inside the Kips Bay Decorator Show House Dallas 2021

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After teasing us with the beautifully hand-drawn interior renderings earlier this month, the second-annual Kips Bay Decorator Show House Dallas is finally open for tours. Set in a Georgian estate located in the Old Preston Hollow district, the showcase features the creative compositions of 26 designers from across the country. Industry sponsors, including Kohler, Perennials and Sutherland, the Shade Store, and Signature Kitchen Suite, among others, contributed to the esteemed event, which benefits the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club in New York, as well as Dallas-based nonprofits Dwell with Dignity and the Crystal Charity Ball.

In signature Kips Bay Show House fashion, many of the featured designs indulge in elements of surprise. Pulp Design Studios transformed the home’s loft space into a multitasking office space. Firm believers in the “work hard, play hard” mentality, principal designers Beth Dotolo and Carolina Gentry crafted a “Sinners Lounge,” accessible only through a secret passageway behind custom cabinetry. “It has all your vices,” says Gentry of the room’s stocked bar and evocative wallpaper custom designed with Fromental. In the home’s entryway, designer John William Bobbitt artfully reimagined a coat closet, reasoning that “it’s too hot to wear coats in Texas, so we had a niche made and installed an early 19th-century Italian sculpture.” And in the formal dining room, AD100 designer Corey Damen Jenkins swaps the traditional single-table furniture plan for a pair of round tables custom designed with show sponsor Cambria.

For AD100 designer Alexa Hampton, the prospect of a shock factor posed an exciting challenge. “Everyone says you can’t do a red bedroom. So, of course, that makes me want to do a red bedroom,” she says. She turned to showcase sponsor Benjamin Moore’s palette to coat the walls, then incorporated crisp white plaster moldings by Hyde Park Mouldings and a Chesneys mantel as counterpoints. The hue appears in other areas of the house as well, namely in darker Bordeaux tones in Janet Gridley’s and Yates Desygn’s interiors.

As always, the show house offers not only an experimental canvas for designers’ creative ideas, but also a stage to promote their new products. Show house attendees will get a first glimpse at AD100 designer Ken Fulk’s Surreal World collection for Pierre Frey (the line’s velvet fabric depicting Roman busts covers the upholstered settee in Fulk’s celestial-inspired interior). AD100 talent Martyn Lawrence Bullard’s new fabric collection for the Shade Store, Alexa Hampton’s forthcoming Gracie Studio collab featuring city maps, and kitchen designer Studio 6F’s cabinet styles for Bentwood Luxury Kitchens are also on display throughout the home.

Below, see inside all the interiors included in the Kips Bay Decorator Show House Dallas 2021, which opens today and will remain on view for IRL and virtual tours through October 24.

Bobbitt & Company Interior Design’s entry hall, named “Perchance to Dream,” features a light sculpture by artist Larry Whiteley.

Stephen Karlisch

To achieve the vision of a European interior, Michael Aiduss Interiors + Architecture trims strié painted walls with traditional plaster moldings made by Casci Ornamental Plaster, which were emphasized using indigo tip brushing.

Stephen Karlisch

In Ken Fulk’s three-part space, dubbed “A Study in Optimism,” guests get a peek at the designer’s forthcoming fabric collection with Pierre Frey, previewed on the upholstered settee in the celestial interior. The room’s sky-map wall covering was specially designed to mimic the constellations that will be above Dallas when the show house opens on September 24.

Stephen Karlisch

Leaning into fantasy with its design following an unprecedented year, Dennis Brackeen Design Group combines historical motifs with modern art in the “Menagerie Chinois” sitting room.

Par Bengtsson

A jubilant floral artwork by Carlyle Wolfe Lee served as the palette starting point for Mary Beth Wagner Interiors’ adjoining hallway and powder room, fittingly titled “Couloir des Fleurs.”

Nathan Shroeder

The versatility of Studio 6F’s kitchen design allows it to adapt from intimate meals to hosted gatherings, all around a custom Cambria quartz island inspired by ​​Angelo Mangiarotti.

Aimée Mazzenga

With “A Tent for New Beginnings,” Corey Damen Jenkins & Associates reimagines the formal dining room format by including a pair of custom Cambria quartz dining tables within the space, which is enveloped by more than 400 square feet of tented fabric, courtesy of Sanderson and Zoffany and installed by French Finish of New York and the Shade Store.

Nathan Schroeder

A. Lantz Design’s “Meet Me in the Family Retreat” living room focuses less on technology and more on art, which was sourced from the designers’ personal collections.

Stephen Karlisch

Wanting to create a serene study, Studio Michael Hilal hand-picked a celadon hue to coat the ceiling, walls, doors, and trim.

Stephen Karlisch

A scenic, hand-painted wall covering by Arte inspires in Traci Connell Interiors’ “Martini Muse” bar room.

Stephen Karlisch

“A Breath of Fresh Air,” the moniker given to the laundry room and hallway, was designed by Kathleen Walsh Interiors. In the room, visitors can find Artistic Tile’s Gin Fizz mosaic tile in the backsplash, as well as hand-painted wallpaper by Fromental.

Stephen Karlisch

Beth Dotolo and Carolina Gentry of Pulp Design Studios had the modern working woman in mind when designing “The Wise and the Wicked” loft space, which comprises an office plus a hidden bathroom and lounge.

Stephen Karlisch

Isla Indigo, an ikat pattern from Leah O’Connell Textiles, swathes Meredith Ellis Design’s guest bedroom, from walls to window drapery to the bed canopy. Benjamin Moore’s Providence Blue paint coats the ceiling trim and millwork in “The Admiral’s Chamber.”

Nathan Schroeder

Designer Shelly Rosenberg of Acorn & Oak designed an accessibility-minded bedroom and bathroom, dubbed “Virginia’s Sanctuary” and integrated with voice-automated technologies from Kohler and the Shade Store.

Stephen Karlisch

Faux-ivory beds, which are draped with embroidered linen, bolster Martyn Lawrence Bullard Design’s charming guest room, dubbed “The Jaipur Room.” The space offers a first look at the designer’s new fabric collection for the Shade Store.

Stephen Karlisch

“La Chambre Rouge” by Alexa Hampton for Mark Hampton LLC refutes the notion that red isn’t meant for the bedroom.

Stephen Karlisch

“The Sanctuary,” as Brant McFarlain Design has titled the primary bathroom, mixes modern and vintage elements, including lighting sourced from local antiques dealer John Gregory Studios alongside Kohler fixtures and faucetry.

Stephen Karlisch

When designing the primary closet, Burkle Creative was inspired by “The Heimat,” which translates to “homeland” in German and conjures a sense of belonging.

Stephen Karlisch

Suede walls hand-painted with an abstract Bordeaux pattern by Ever Atelier create a sultry environ in Yates Desygn’s basement space, which is well stocked for game and movie nights.

Stephen Karlisch

With Hubert de Givenchy’s Manoir du Jonchet as its muse, Caroline Gidiere Design LLC creates a beautifully layered “Le Chemin au Jonchet” hallway and powder room with help from custom wallpaper by Gracie Studio and Chinese porcelain sourced from Nick Brock Antiques.

Stephen Karlisch

Designer Janet Gridley’s basement study keeps in mind more modern sensibilities with the addition of a podcast sound booth and a turntable nook.

Stephen Karlisch

Virginia Woolf references abound in Liz MacPhail Interiors’ feminine space, aptly titled “A Lounge of Her Own,” where rich aubergine-painted panels and inlaid antique mirrors surround, and seating arrangements are conveniently mobile.

Stephen Karlisch

A green-striped Voutsa wallpaper detailed with Houlès tassel fringe sets the “Moulin Rouge” scene in the media lounge by Courtnay Tartt Elias at Creative Tonic Design.

Julie Soefer

For the treillage garden and Jefferson pavilion, landscape architects Outside Garden sourced ideas from Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello property.

Stephen Karlisch

What if Slim Aarons had come to Dallas? That was Robin Henry Studio’s original thinking when conceiving the Georgian home’s veranda and pool deck. A chicly preppy and fun-filled design ensued.

Stephen Karlisch